Now Recruiting Year 2 Participants

What: A unique project that uses the performing arts to learn about climate change and how it is altering our lives. Community participants (this could be you!) will collaborate with a team made up of theater artists, scientists, and science educators to co-create a performance to share with their community. Themes and stories will be drawn from participants' lived experiences and woven with current climate science.

 

Why: Science communication about climate change has not been very effective. We think that the arts can help people better understand how environmental change impacts all of our lives. Residents of 70126, 70127, and 70128 have seen the effects climate change on the neighborhood first hand - increased street flooding, more frequent hurricanes, hotter summers - so we need your expertise and experience. In addition to making theater, we will be researching this collaborative process and how it can promote empowered decision making around these issues.

 

Who: Fifteen adults 18 and over from 70126, 7027, and 70128 who are interested in collaborating and sharing knowledge about local climate impacts and how to respond. No performance or science expertise necessary, but we do ask for a willingness to share your stories with one another and the larger public, and an interest in performing or being a part of creating a performance (Stage management, production, visual art, music, etc.) Collaborators will include local New Orleans Artists Kathy Randels and Rodneka Shelbia, science educators Karen Marshall and Elyria Grote, Louisiana state climatologist Barry Keim, and graduate researcher Cameron Goff.

 

Where: STEM NOLA, 6600 Plaza Dr. New Orleans, LA 70127

 

When: April and May 2022. Total commitment of 60 hours. See application form for exact dates and time. Priority will be given to applications received by March 15, 2022.

What’s in it for me? Arts experience, learning about flood risk and climate science, story sharing, get to know your neighbors, thinking deeply about making decisions about the future under climate change and a $1300 stipend per person.

 

We are aware that New Orleanians have been “over researched” since Hurricane Katrina and that some community members may recoil from the idea of furthur research. The majority of the people leading this project are New Orleans natives and feel this will be a valuable experience in building community power and leadership in regard to the ongoing devastating effects of climate change and failing city infrastructure in our neighborhoods. This is a participatory, collaborative experience; every voice is valued and heard.